Category: Advertising & Marketing

Passing the HGV Theory Test: 4 Tips to Help You Ace It the First Time

All that studying has taken so much time, you’ve put so much effort in, and now the big day approaches as your HGV theory test is now just around the corner. First of all, congratulations on learning to drive an HGV and displaying the hard work, skills, and strong handle on qualifications that you need to even get to this point. But maybe theory has you a bit worried. Does “theory test” break you out in a cold sweat?

There’s no denying it can be stressful. You might even be having flashbacks of those early driving tests when you know that you were thoroughly out of your depth. The good news is that your actual HGV theory test doesn’t have to be like that. Follow these tips to prepare and you’ll be positioned perfectly to ace it on the first go through!

Learn the Format Ahead of Time

Preparation matters and the first thing you can do to inspire confidence in yourself is to understand the setup so you don’t have to worry about any unexpected and unwanted surprises. Nailing the format is just part one of this process. This isn’t like a standard driving test, and you should be prepared for a long test.

There will be 100 multiple choice questions covering about everything under the sun when it comes to safely operating an HGV. There is a written test section all about safety and hazards, as well as 19 videos you will need to watch to spot 20 potential hazards. The videos come with another 100 multiple choice questions.

While this can feel really intimidating the good news is that by being ready for it, you won’t be nearly as overwhelmed and will be mentally prepared to nail the grind and hammer it through.

Take Advantage of Practice Tests

Very few things can help you prepared better than a good practice test with The LGV Training Company. This simulates the pressure of taking a test, the format, and puts you in a great position to be ready for whatever challenges you might run into. Things are also always the most nerve-wracking the first time through. By taking a practice test you eliminate that initial nervousness.

Don’t feel like you have to restrict yourself to one. Take two or three, whatever it takes for you to get fully comfortable with the gruelling and challenging aspects of the test so you’re not nervous about the setup when it actually counts. There are many different practice tests out there that simulate the types of questions you might run into, all set up in the challenging style you can expect.

And there’s no record of the test scores on the practice tests, as well as no limits to how many you can take. So there’s no reason to worry about limiting yourself. Take advantage of these until you can go into the theory test fully confident about what to expect when the real one comes around.

Hazard Perception Is Challenging

Furniture Buyer’s Guide

Whether you are looking for the latest pieces of furniture to fit your modern apartment or a specific colonial piece to complement your home, there are many things to consider when finding the perfect piece of furniture on the market. Here are some tips to consider when buying the perfect piece of furniture for your home.

The Furniture Market

Furniture has been on the market for many decades. In fact, it has had a steady growth since 1968. Furniture that is more than 100 years old, that have been conserved well through antique furniture restoration, is considered antique furniture. They come in numerous makes and genres. Some of the most sought-after pieces include Chippendale, Rococo, Baroque and Colonial furniture. There are many other popular furniture periods such as Pennsylvanian Dutch, Early American and Georgian.

The value of a piece of furniture can increase due to many reasons such as the rarity, design, provenance, utility and other unique features. For example, the Harrington Commode sold for £3.8 million in 2010. Rarity was the unique feature of this piece of furniture – probably created by Thomas Chippendale himself. In fact, there were three bidders competing for the piece which resulted in a hammer price that was three times its original valuation.

Even though high-end and older pieces of furniture usually achieve record prices, there are many other pieces that are available for the novice or less experienced collector out there. On the other hand, mid-century (20th century or retro) furniture from the 50’s and 60’s is also on the rise. Some of the most notable furniture within this time frame includes Scandinavian design and furniture by designers such as G-Plan. In fact, some of the popular furniture stores in London are beginning to showcase furniture pieces from the 1951 Festival of Britain.

Is the Condition Important?

Of course, the condition of the piece is important for antique pieces. But a real antique piece will show some wear and tear. If you know how to determine the condition of a piece of furniture, you can identify if the piece is genuine or fake. For example, antique wooden chairs show more wear and tear on the back legs compared to the front legs. This is because the user would continually lean back on his/her chair. The top and end of the wooden arm also will show wear and tear compared to the inside of the arms. That is because these areas come into contact with the user more than any other area of the chair.

What Type of Furniture Should You Collect?

You should collect pieces that you prefer. After all, you are the one who would be living with your furniture collection. Popular antique furniture designs can vary from region to region. In fact, oak and country furniture has become more popular in recent times than other genres of furniture. Most of the time, people who live in the countryside choose furniture to reflect the period his/her house was built. These folks …

HGV Driving Hours – How to Stay Legal?

If you are a goods vehicle driver within the UK then you will already be familiar with the enforced rest hours and driving hour limits, especially considering the HGV course price you pay for training. However, if you are not aware of them then it is important that you learn about them right away since going over the limit can get you into serious trouble. The limits are for your safety as well as other road users safety. Driving an HGV when you are tired can turn the vehicle into a very dangerous weapon and all accidents can potentially have fatal consequences. It is critical that you take these rules seriously.

We are offering the following information based on our own interpretation of Department of Transport rules. It is critical that you read these rules yourself and fully understand them. There are three different sets of rules that might apply; GB domestic rules, AETR rules or EU rules. Each of these sets of rules is different and it will depend on what and where you are driving to determine which set of rules applies to your situation.

For international trips, either the AETR or EU rules will apply.

Whether you are driving a goods vehicle for commercial purposes or private purposes, the rules still apply. The following are the key elements of the EU driving hours rules:

Limits on daily driving – According to the EU regulations for driving hours:

  • You are not allowed to drive over 9 hours in one day and may be increased to 10 hours two times per week.
  • 56 hours a week
  • 90 hours over two consecutive weeks

A Tachograph must be used to record all of this information and then you must submit it to your employer.

The following covers the EU rules on rest and breaks you are required to take:

  • You are required to rest for 11 hours every day at least; it may be reduced to only 9 hours of rest per day three times within a two week rest period.
  • You are required to have a 45-hour unbroken rest period. Every other week it may be reduced down to 24 hours.
  • You are required to take breaks of 45 minutes at least in total after driving for no more than 4 1/2 hours.

Weekly rest after working 6 consecutive 24 hour time periods beginning from the end of the last weekly rest period that was taken.

Employers Rules

Employers are required to monitoring the working time of their drivers and ensure they do not exceed the limits. Employers are also required to record working time. The records must be kept for 2 years at least.

The regulations are enforced by the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA). If you break any of these rules you could receive:

  • An improvement notice – which sets out the changes that you must make by a specific date
  • A prohibition notice – requires you to either start to comply with the regulations or stop

HGV Safety Control Features

A simple Google news search on ‘HGV’ prompts dozens of stories on HGV Accidents and other risky things about heavy goods vehicles on the results pages. Although HGV accidents aren’t as frequent as the media tries to put it, the dramatic nature of how they happen is what gives them such attention. Heavy goods vehicles are among the safest vehicles on the road, thanks to the rigorous HGV training and numerous safety controls and checks put in place to make them safe. This article outlines some of the main safety features in HGVs that contribute to keeping everyone on the road safe and to prevent accidents.

Speed Limiters

Speed governors are very common in HGVs today. These gadgets work diligently to prevent the driver cruising at speeds that would be dangerous to both the truck and other road users. Most HGV manufacturers have the speed limiters inside the engine as a way to ensure the truck’s speed is monitored and capped at set speeds always. Most HGVs have their top speeds set at 70 MPH. The set speed allows the driver to have total control of the truck, keep a safe braking distance, etc. In addition to this, the set speed limit is indicated on the back of the truck to help let other drivers know what speeds the truck could be doing.

Enforced Driving Time Limits

Tiredness from driving for extended periods of time is one of the leading causes of road accidents today. Statistics show that fatigue kills more drivers per year than drugs, alcohol and bad weather combined. Interestingly enough, most of these victims are highly experienced, professional drivers. Regulations have, therefore, been set detailing how long a driver is allowed to sit at the wheel. These regulations come in single day shifts extending up to 2 weeks. HGV drivers must not drive for more than:

  • 10 hours twice a week, or 9 hours a day
  • 56 hours within a span of 7 days
  • 90 hours within 14 days

HGVs have a tracking feature, the tachograph that records the drivers’ driving time as well as time their breaks. The recorded data is stored whereby the employer can track and monitor the drivers’ performances. Thanks to this feature, most HGV drivers remain fit to drive and are always alert on the road.

Safety Technologies

HGVs are also fitted with extra safety features and technologies meant to keep drivers safe. Some of the standard security safety features and technologies installed in most HGVs include:

  1. Reversing cameras
  2. Rear view cameras
  3. Vehicle radars
  4. Digital video recorders (DVRs)
  5. GPS tracking
  6. Auto braking systems
  7. RFID technology
  8. Mirror monitors
  9. Air bags
  10. General vehicle safety equipment

All these gadgets assist HGV drivers to drive safely, particularly when driving in the right lane, cyclist collisions, reversing accidents, sideswipes on motorways, as well reduce cases of stolen goods from the cabin.

Training

In addition to the standard driving courses, HGV drivers receive enhanced driving techniques to enable them to handle such heavy trucks, expertly. In addition to …